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20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
economy and you look at the industrial revolution and the introduction of the automobile, all these changes in our society are powered by technology which changes the pace of everything from how we communicate and how fast we expect people to respond to things to our political system and the pace of how quickly things happen and being in a constant feedback loop to the ability to trade stock in non-of seconds. millennials or at the forefront of that. we understand that is reality so other generations are running around saying how do we adapt then how do we move? how do we go forward in this fast-paced world and millennials are taking it all in stride because that is the reality of how we grow. it's also brought us a sense of ease and adaptability. it's brought us the ability to be resilient in the economic crisis which has led to incredible youth unemployment and incredible debt for young people. young people are optimistic about their long-term economic future because they see that in one year could be totally different. we saw how quickly it started and we can see how quickl
that shifts the fundamentals of our economy. the industrial revolution and introduction of the changes in society are powered by the exponential technology that changes the pace of everything from how we communicate and how fast we expect people to respond to things to our political system and the pace of how quickly things happen and being on constant feedback account millennials are the forefront of that. how we move forward in this fast-paced world the millennial are taking it in stride because that is the reality of how we go out and also it's brought us a sense of easing adaptability. it's brought us to be resilient in the economic crisis that has led to incredible youth unemployment and incredible debt for young people. young people are optimistic about their long-term economic future because they see that in one year it can be totally different because we saw how quickly it started and how quickly it might go away. there's a sense of optimism and social mindedness which i think came out of line 11 which is in the minds of a lot of this generation seeing our country in that momen
these kind of revolution that shifts fundamentals of our economy. you look at the industry evolution, the introduction of the automobile, all these changes in our society are powered by exponential technology, which changes the pace of everything from how we communicate and how fast we expect people to respond to things, to our political system and the pace of how quickly things happen and being on constant -- in a constant feedback loop. the ability to trade stocks in nanoseconds. so, millenials are at the forefront of that. we understand that as reality. so, other generations are running around saying, how do we adapt? good forward any fast-paced world. the millenials are taking it all in stride because that's the reality of how we agree up, and also brought the sense of ease and adaptability and the ability to be resilient, the economic crisis, which, wow, has led to incredible youth unemployment, and incredible debt for young people. young people are optimistic about their long-term economic future because they see in one year it could be totally different. we saw how quickly it
america's case on a daily basis because he would be's with the economy. so one of the many reasons why he chose her as secretary of state because she knew she could do that for him on a daily basis around the world. that's why i think that she would bring to him accurate reading of where things stood. what she could deliver to him in terms of moving forward in terms of agreement, where the players were when it comes to libya, for example. deliver to him the -- what was needed for him to make the decision. she lost some battles but she certainly influenced a lot of decision. libya being one of them, and asia definitely. >> host: we'll get to libya next. a very interesting scenario and what happened there. but just one last question on the israeli-palestinian conflict. i was covering aipac in 2010 and she spoke there and she said farflung destinations from the chronic where she would be traveling, that issue would come up as the first, second, or third issue, and it struck me as unlikely, other than europe, that people would be focusing on this far-flung destination, and once we saw wikilea
the world and make america's case on a daily basis because he was going to be busy at home with the economy. so there was a very clear reason why he -- one of the many reasons why he chose her as secretary of state, because he knew she could do that for him on a daily basis in all around the world. and that's why i think that she would bring to him an accurate reading of where things stood, what she could deliver to him in terms of moving forward, in terms of agreement, in terms of where the players were when it comes to libya, for example. deliver to him, you know, what was needed for him to make the decision. she lost some battles, but she certainly influenced a lot of decisions. libya being one of them and asia, definitely. >> host: uh-huh, and we'll get to libya next, actually, i find that a -- it was a or very interesting scenario in what happened there. but just one last question on the israeli/palestinian conflict. i was covering aipac in 2010 when hillary clinton spoke at the conference, and she mentioned at the time something that i thought was interesting. she said that far-flung
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)